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20121027
20121104
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was elected as a representative 2010. he served as an investment counsel for the u.s. government reform committee. gentlemen, welcome. it's good to have you here. gentleman you are now both on record as saying you would be open to raising revenue as part of plan to balance the budget and congressman's dold your opponent says as a general proposition he supports 70% and cuts versus 30% in new revenues. what percentage breakdowns would you support? dold: i'm not so sure i have a percentage breakdown. what i've done his work with my colleagues on the other side of the aisle and the only bipartisan budget that has come to the florida generation and frankly i think that is what we need to be talking about. need to be talking about how we can get folks together republicans and democrats alike running an organization i know that the only successful organizations are those that come together and actually solve problems and have some sort of compromise. >> moderator: you were asked if you would accept a 1 dollar increase for
. making demands on their government, demands for transparency and accountability. if they do not find alternatives, they could be in trouble. if you have a business, to help us solve this saudi arabia problem, you would be in a competitive position. this is not a theory. it works. i had the opportunity last week to congratulate ceo of electro- motor diesel, now part of the caterpillar company, on a contract for locomotives. a little over two years ago, a previous executive was in my office bemoaning the reality that he was about to lose a competitive bid to another country based on costs. even though we have had provided advocacy to the ministry on its behalf. he was sure that the contract award would be on price. when i asked him for his value proposition, he had little to offer other than our locomotives are better than theirs. they lost. fortunately, the saudi arabians agreed to take the winning entry on approval basis for two years. so they had a chance. a new team came forward and we discussed at length what it takes to win. the principles are fairly straightforward. first, find
end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact that they have that information to the government and say, look, make the case for why we should no
in one hand just appalled, says the federal government is doing all that can to help restore power to the areas affected by hurricane sandy. a 45 minute speech at a cybersecurity summit she also said she hoped the senate would consider cybersecurity legislation after the election. >> it's a perfect morning to talk about scary things, scary things with unpleasant names like mel where and computer worms and trojan horses and even little messages when you get in your in box because you're nothing but headaches and loss. if you don't like the idea of people snooping around your in box or personal e-mail. you care about a company that stirs up electronically and worries about competitive theft over the internet and a few flaws and recently to the director of the cia painted a dire picture of day-to-day cybercrime and the foreign enemies if we don't show ourselves up can inflict enormous damage to the power grid water system and critical infrastructure. we would worry about plans and bombs and not worry about good intentions and acting skills. people care and increasingly so and so this
money. you make your money working for the government are doing your money -- you and your husband make almost three and $50,000 a year. my income is earned by having companies that employ workers in this a. i think the bigger question is, you've got something hidden in your to secret family trusts that you won't disclose and you haven't disclosed. so ms. hochul, ladies and those to secret family trusts ask because i've a feeling they may be something you don't want the voters to know. hochul: you've got to be kidding me. give it a pretty big you're the one who has refused to put your personal taxes on one because you said the voters basically were not smart enough to understand. i think that's pretty derogatory toward voters personally. but you're the one, mitt romney has 300 page tax return but even he put his out there. we all felt at that financial disclosure. big deal. i don't have to do it. why won't you tell us where your assets are, the question is what are you hiding? all of us can even mitt romney and other people running for office have done. why won't you, chris? collins: i
as a person on, you know, litigating this issue that the government wants to have it both ways. they want to talk over and over again about the drone strikes but never tell us what they don't want us to know. and that -- doesn't the leak system fail? and you deny pain sociologically, but isn't that the failure that the cards are all held by the government? >> yeah. this goes to what i was trying to get at earlier about the necessary constructive ambiguity that the government wants in this area. if what you said is right, that the government, the government wants to have it both ways and the same people who are trying to deny these foia suits are the ones in some concerted way leaking, then we have a real basis for cynicism. however, since leaks are not this monolithic phenomenon, we don't really know who's saying what, there's a lot of quasi-authorized talking, it's hard to pin down that charge on the white house since it's hard to say what they might have disclosed through leaks versus anyone else -- >> but why should we divide the government like that? isn't it one government? >> yeah.
to see how your government works directly, c-span is the only place to go. >> until a few months ago, charles haldeman of freddie mac. he began the job in 2096 months after the company was taken over by the federal government. mr. haldeman spoke about the housing market and financial regulations at the john f. kennedy school of government. this is just under an hour. >> i'm a member of the faculty here at the kennedy school at a romani school of business and government. it's a pleasure to welcome all of you to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are call
's no unified government, it's fragmented at the bureaucracy level, and there's this capacity issue, serious capacity issue within government. what's the advice? >> well, i don't suspect that a lot of the entrepreneurs in this room who are the talent pool for the next economy in detroit are thinking how do i get a job with the city. so -- >> no career advice. >> no, but i mean, seriously. the young talent pool, the 20-somethings and 30-somethings are not thinking about the public sector as a career path. so let's just be blunt and honest. the city is not going to be able to harness the talent that's there that will get the city to the next place. so invert the question. not how are we going to hire those people, but how are we going to bring them into the process sitting where they are in universities, in the private sector, in the ngos that are dynamic and interested in the city of the future, and the city has to invent the way to do that. collaborate, create communities of interest, harness that talent pool, um, and give them the resources where it's necessary if the resources are there. n
, not the u.s. government, because i'm about to hammer them. we do not have the kind of leadership that required to have coalitions put together to deal with this situation. it is a soft power or hard power. and it may not happen properly anytime in the near future your remember that caveat. now, the other day i was reading through a book by save the children. it's about the children of syria. and if you haven't read this book and you want to understand what's happening in syria, i recommend you read it. but i assure you, you will feel very uncomfortable on page one. there are costs involved with the situation that could go on for generations, not just for now. generations. think about the children are going through now and how they will think about the west. the international community, their arab brothers, the reins, the russians, the chinese, the united states, and just about everyone else. even if this might be over in the next year or so, it will definitely not be over for those children. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. ambassador? >> i agree with most of what i heard from
not the federal government is going to fund abortion. at nothing, with exceptions of the case of rape and incest. dan knows that. he has distorted this view. he has distort my position and he owes an apology to everyone in this district who has been a victim of rape in us to listen to his accusations and his false charges. >> moderator: are you willing to apologize? maffei: the reason i brought this issue up is because countless women from this district came to me and they said, ann marie buerkle is not doing the job of porting the economy. when she is here she talks about that but when she's in washington she follows this particular social issue agenda that she has. she sang as soon as they're she got rid of it. it's a three-page bill that everybody cosponsored you should be reading the it's a three-page bill. she knew that language was in there, and the reason she is against abortion, okay fine but she's against it in the case of rape and incest. i'm not covering that up. that's your position. so she's on opportunity to maybe make it so that someone who are raped couldn't get abortions. fine,
. host: is a short amount of your district, the sixth district, talk about what the federal government is point to do and whether there will be enough funding for the damage out there in new jersey and up and down the east coast. guest: we have got to make sure there is enough funding. this is like to take emergency appropriations bill to pay for. there's not enough money for disaster relief. there's got to be an emergency appropriation. i think it has to be robust enough to cover all of this. it is going to be very costly. just looking at where i was yesterday, yesterday i went to bellmawr, new jersey to look at the damage. you have all of the sand that washed away from the beach. you are talking about beach replenishment. and all of the damage to homes. some people have insurance. but for those who do not, or if their insurance is not complete enough to provide insurance, the federal government has got to help out. and i am certain that we will pass an appropriations bill to cover this, but it will be in the billions of dollars. i hope our colleagues on both sides of the aisle unders
i am not confident that there is a measure that the government can take to make everything more secure. what i do believe would be possible is there could be a better way to incentivize. because right now when we heard dimitri with the oil company ceo, he has said, i have these regulatory issues. how long can i try to contain this before i bring others and? >> maybe we can keep this under the rug. there is a lot happening there. have you incentivize them to share information. >> i have to jump in. okay. i'm just a girl trying to protect a network share. the thing is i don't believe that this is the right model. i think crime is a better model. if you look at crime now, people say, well, you pour more money into it, then are we going to reduce crime. if we have more policemen, is that going to reduce crime? if you have laws, regulations won't stop it, laws won't stop it, it is just vigilant. vigilance about citizens protection and the way that they need to comment having law enforcement in the right places in order to best leverage a limited number of resources. and i think we re
with government, you will shut up. we just don't see much except that the piece published in "the wall street journal" a few weeks ago. >> i mean come on someone with some of those cases. they go back now about five or six years. i think in the middle of the bush administration i've talked to some of the flag officers, retired flag officers, who got phone calls, threatening that their pension rights were going to be under review and things like that. i think it was a completely outrageous statement at this and why -- i think obviously serving military officers is one thing, and didn't have all sorts of obligations that they limit directly their participation in public debate, public discussion. but once they are retired and completely free to speak, and i think they can play a meaningful role in public debate conversation. and then to use the power of government to silence them is completely outrageous. >> they're not completely legally free. >> secrets. >> they will all have signed, you know, agreements not to talk about classified material, even postretirement. and there, too, i would just
financial company and to complete the government at divestiture the idea would be that the enterprise could be recapitalized by creditors and the financial company receiving a combination of cash, equity or debt in satisfaction of the claims against the receivership. the strategy has the advantage of returning the company to private ownership and insurers as possible avoiding an even bigger too big to fail company. it also would likely promote the stability in the financial markets of the mandates. a few words about international cooperation because that's certainly been a big issue in connection with how we going to do this? there is a lot of work done. certainly in the recent financial crisis that has been increased awareness on the degree to which these large financial companies operate across the borders. and so, obviously the resolution has to be coordinated internationally to reduce the risk of disruption. so, there is no current international insolvency framework to resolve a global the systemically important financial institution in a comprehensive manner so we really need to do adv
, the government already announced that some 500 will have been withdrawn by the end of this year. next year to take further decisions which the government has not yet taken, and you have to ask the defense secretary, you know, when he thinks that's possible. >> we are talking a time line of slightly more than two years, so i think things can change. i recognize that. >> yeah. i think the prime minister said what they're looking for is a glide past the end of 2014. the government will take those decisions when it's ready. >> what events will clearly dictate political decisions, not asking you to comment on political decisions, but dictate what happens -- >> i can give you confidence the figures announced by the prime minister out by december, that will be delivered. we'll be done. >> thank you very much. my last question, chairman, is is there any -- anybody heard anything about possibility of nato or the united states in particular? withdrawing significant troops earlier than the end of 2014? >> i think the united states also will want to take some provisions next year, and in light of the
oversight and government reform committee. gentlemen, welcome to chicago tonight. it's good to have you here. >> thank you. good to be here. >> moderator: you're both on record as saying you'd be open to raising revenue as part of a plan to balance the budget. congressman dold, your opponent says he'd support 70% in cuts versus 30% in new revenues. what percentage breakdown would you support? dold: i'm not so sure i have a percentage breakdown. i have worked with my colleagues on the other side of the aisle in the only bipartisan budget that's come to the floor in a generation and, frankly, we need to be talking about how we can get folks together, republicans and democrats alike. running an organization, i certainly know that the only successful organizations are those that come together and actually solve problems and have some sort of compromise. >> moderator: but in terms of a compass point, you were asked recently would you accept the $1 tax increase for $10 in cuts, and you said yes. dold: sure. >> moderator: somewhere between that and 70/30, i mean, just as a general proposition? dold
cut pennies left alone billions. >> host: you have a new book? >> government police. weird not talking about murder or rape or stealing but people who put the dirt on their own property some of these came out of the first george bush rethink you should not put people in jail. and the old days there was a difference between criminal law and tort law it was called intent if you accelerated somebody that was not murder now there is a man in jail southern mississippi 10 years without parole for putting clean fill dirt on his land sometimes it is moving dirt from an area to another. some was well intended the clean water act says you cannot dump pollutants per kriet agree. no chemical company should be allowed the nine your own land is not the same as dumping chemicals. >> host: and utilities and the senate? >> i brought the peg family from idaho ss of new $5,000 per day fine and told they cannot build on their land no water touches there they and it there's no rainwater new government said it is a wetland. looked at the website. it is not there. they say the website is not perfect. another
miller who is a former government hacker who worked on the good side is now a security specialist. the great hackers of the world. he last year decided to explore vulnerabilities and he found a vulnerability in the iphone that's when he deployed it the right way, this was for a contest, enabled him to take over a portion of that iphone. industrial control computers run water systems and electric grids and so on. last year, a disgruntled hacker of broad went into a water system and in south houston, in texas and got control of those computers. the list goes on and on. there are hacks of google and rsa. there are millions of attacks, literally millions of attacks around the world and intrusions on computer systems every day in the world. probably the most phenomenal attack involved a warm called stuxnet and in that case, the united states government i think working with israel that the united states government developed a computer worm that went into the nuclear process facilities in iran and disrupted the centrifuges. >> host: so it was developed by the u.s. government? >> guest: y
on it now i will do nothing. that will be protected. that's between the government and the them. that's protected. but all i had some plans that will save it for the long haul and i will end at that. you're very gracious with time. smith: de leggitt rebuttal time? >> moderator: how much you need? how about 15 seconds. smith: the most radical proposals in the congress and the senate any way that a grand total of 16 votes was the so-called rand paul plan. the rhine and budget has all kind of problems because when it comes to medicare, this is a basic debate about ending the medicare guaranteed benefit preserving my record indicates not just preserving but strengthen. >> moderator: monica ag you have the last question. >> because of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is no
strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors in the ecocar competition. others race to get their vehicle to the moon in the lunar x prize competition. meteorology students won the forecasting challenge, and notably this week, more than 3400 penn
the official policy of federal government actually occurred during the clinton administration when the iraq liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservative, so we will get back to the middle point. based on what he just said, during the bush years, bush-cheney, the focus was foreign policy. guantÁnamo bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated th
in place in the federal and state government level that treats women as underperforming victims of the patriarch? gives them preference in hiring and federal contracting. >> guest: let's go case by case. i will take the university's first. their i think, you know, there is quietly affirmative action for man commander just don't talk about it or admit it. you have to go case by case. in the workplace, there are lots of ways, and really because i describe the phenomenon and describe that women are rising in the work force does not -- there is a parallel thing of how women get paid and negotiate and where they start on a ladder and how they're treated in the work force and whether or not we have maternity leave. those questions are totally not settled. women are rising and setting down roots and getting the structure and education that they need, but the work force does not necessarily welcome the man. there is a lot of, you know, equality in the workforce. >> host: let me give you a really simple. the small business administration gives loans to small businesses. under the obama a
incredibly involved in trying to help the u.s. government think more intelligently about competitiveness and entrepreneurship in particular. then josh linkner, a local star here who runs detroit venture partners as i'm sure many of you know, if you're from detroit, you certainly know that, a supporter of this event which we're very grateful for, and i think symbolic of the incredible new energy that's developing in detroit. and i should also say that josh created a company calls eprize in 1999 here in detroit. it's been operating all this time. two weeks ago it sold for a nice exit. [applause] so here's the story of a local company that came from here, went all the way and, you know, he's done real well with that. meanwhile, he's invested in a ton of other companies. so i just want to start by asking you, steve, you know, when i told you about this, you immediately dropped it. why did you think techonomy detroit was a good idea? >> well, i think it's a great idea. i think it's great you're willing to shine a spotlight on detroit. it's not just about detroit, the story about entrepreneurs
and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here for a luncheon program on the of the commonwealth club can you see both dolph and frank in one week. [laughter] congressman frank will be here discussing the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwealth club agents all of whom are as interested as you are in savitt discussion and social interaction. now want to this evening's program, there are question cards you should have been handed on your seats for joan walsh. fill them out, right on the question and there will be collected and we will ask them i
years in the federal government. those agencies comprise about 40% of our discretionary budget. they are not doing that and they should be looking at the constituents. thank you very much. >> moderator: senator cynthia dill? dill: i am running because i want to make a difference. i believe america needs a new generation of leadership. what is wrong with the congress is extreme politics and in this particular race, by two major opponents represent the status quo. on one hand we have charlie summers and on the other hand we have angus king. today's "new york times" characterizes this race as karl rove versus michael bloomberg. what i am offering the people of the state of maine is to independence, someone who is not local and out-of-state money but only beholden to you and your family. so i look forward to tonight's discussion. we do need a new generation of leadership and i'm pleased to be in the race and i hope to have your support. >> moderator: thank you andrew ian dodge? dodge: those of you in maine might recognize my name. we have been here since before maine was a state an
think that there is going to be a mentality to get the government spending any money at all because -- i would agree to this point if there is not enough money i think we could drive more efficient cars and we could change the power plants but if there isn't a profit of changing to natural gas, companies won't do it. they are not going to lose money to change their power plant over to natural gas. the afton de subsidize. i think it is a sad day because america needs to admit climate change is real and we don't have the money to fix it. i don't have the answer for you but it's ignorant to ignore it. >> host: that's john of the mexico. the presidential candidates were sidelined on the storm from campaigning six days ago before next tuesday's election and here is the headline on the "the washington times" romney balances sympathy and politics to raise donations here's what he had to say about the rally yesterday. i proceed affect people in dayton got up this morning, some went to the grocery store and purchased some things that these families will need, and i appreciate your generosity. it'
government. as late as 1855 walt whitman proclaimed, quote, "the united states with vaining full of poetical stuff," and lincoln declared they changed the grammar and perception in the 1860s. in 1825, the sea to shining sea continental nation, a patriotic song, still a dream. the land was vast, and control of it was limited. the louisiana territory was purchased two decades earlier, but remained unorganized. mexico's north stretch from the sabine river on the gulf of mexico to the 42nd parallel on the pacific ocean what is now texas, arizona, new mexico, utah, nevada, california, colorado, oklahoma, and kansas. the pacific northwest was open country. back east, the appalachian mountain range guarding the interior from south carolina who what was recently maine threatened to confine the great american experiment to the atlantic sea board. the allegiance of the several transstates was unproven. there, settlers looked west down valleys to the mighty mississippi, not over their shoulders that the mountains that separated them from the political creators. former vice president conspiracy of 1805
that we are the government and we're here to help. in this case it actually is absolutely true. >> on that note we have run out of time. please help me thinking the panelists today. [applause] >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs, wiki's feature live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events. every week and the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join the conversation on social media sites. >> democratic freshman congresswoman kathy hochul faces a challenge from republican chris collins. congresswoman coal-fueled clear the represents new york's 26th district that is running an the 27th because of redistricting. mr. collins is in erie county executive. their hour-long debate comes to us courtesy of ynn-tv. >> welcome to the special presentation from ynn. i'm liz benjamin spent over the next that we will be bringing you a debate between democratic congresswoman kathy hochul and republican challenger chris collins. nenew york the 27th congre
forest is a self-regulating when was the we put regulations incumbent government regulations, that's a part of self-regulation spirit of the self-regulating cells and career goals for ourselves, that self-regulation. their scarce resources, competitions like the rain forest. but the main thing that keeps the rain forest by brent is that you have the canopy coming in outcome and the u.s. economy would be good big firms coming ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. and then he got small business, but it's the small and growing. it's sickening that were small and can challenge the date and what happens in the big tree falls over. again, the amazing thing is new trees grow right out of the old trees. that is a metaphor, but it's real. because i'm really something big in the economy, it's vital we know how to reconfigure resources and create some new out of it. so do we need control? we need feed back. we need the capabilities to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and that's why
- stabilizing influence, and mason governments are facing government. and these opportunists are may be unpredictable. and i was use iraq as an example. there were lots of opportunists and iraq. iran, turkey, saudi arabia, kuwait, nonstate actors all opportunists trying to get finish of a situation or how to set project itself around the world? what does it mean to us as we look for the future conflicts? the character of conflict is changing by the operational environment conflict is change. but in my mind the fundamental nature of work remains the same. that's the struggle to influence populations in governance. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and context that we see it. the army has great 237 years ago to defend this nation comes to the interests of states abroad, and in my opinion that imperative has not changed. so as i got a force for the future, the one thing i tell everyone is that we're starting from a position of strength. and why do i say that? because of the army specifically with the most com
't based on the inalienable right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness and self-government but the essence of revolution is you have to win. nobody hands you victory in revolution. that is what the war was about but then the war ends and the south has to be reintegrated into the union. but there are all these unreconstructed confederates who still believed they had the better part of the argument and the white race should be supreme in the south, who resent entirely the fact that abolition was imposed on the south but whereas during the civil war they didn't have a vote, didn't have a say and the national government, all of a sudden they do. during war, the rules of democracy were suspended. democracy is based on majority rule. once the war ends democracy kicks back in and so the south has to be reintegrated politically and when grant was nominated for president in 1868 grant was first of all nominee by acclamation of the republican party. grant did not lift a finger on his own behalf. allowed himself to be nominated and allowed himself to be elected. one thing, he didn't g
a uniform standard governing conduct of investment advisers or broker dealers and to develop a comprehensive regulatory regime for over-the-counter derivatives among many other things. today is like to focus on a few specific provisions of the act, tying back to fundamentals and mentioned a moment ago in hopes that should the students who are with us today ever put your impressive educations to use as public servant, you will look back -- you look at potential regulation and just display. so let me start with title vii of dodd-frank, part of the active for the first time creates a comprehensive regulatory regime for the over-the-counter toronto-based market. title vii illustrates the importance of financial fundamentals on a vast scale, addressing nature of this market with a global notional value of some $650 trillion. derivatives are financial products and derive their value from some underlying theme and one common type of derivative is a swap, which is the financial contract in which two counterparties agree to exchange or sloppiness with each other as a result of things such as changes
.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular t
than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are many powerful moments you describe. i am wondering if you could share a couple of those with us. in particular, a juncture where you are actually stopped by the u.s. border patrol as you enter and you are in an operation. >> that was one of many dramatic moments, i was the new mexico state trooper. you will see the picture in my book, i had a big afro and long hair and when i was a federal agent, picked me up. quite dramatic and had been under cover by myself in mexico. i had been in a small hotel in mexico that was fully invested
advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself around the world? what does that mean to us as we look at the future of conflict? the operational environment of conflict is changing but in my mind the fundamental nature of war remains the same and that is the struggle to influence populations in governance. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and the context we see it. the army was created 237 years go to defend this great nation insecure abroad and in my opinion that appear -- imperative does not change so the one thing i tell everyone you said we are starting from a position of strength and why do i say that? because in the army specifically we have the most combat tested, combat ready experience force we
government. in the south major institution is the republicans' determination into a unit to win a national election without southern support republicans condemned the south as undemocratic. even un-american. with this party on the threshold for those who practice the gospel and newspaper columns the crisis for the south was at hand. from the hatred of evil republicans to fill the southern air. this is not the first time. there have been several disputes. 2.specifically, first, the constitutional convention to do with the admission of missouri as of slave state -- state midges much more than the state of louisiana from domestic guerrilla to the rocky mountains it was settled by the missouri compromise. then the nullification encounter mercy it was already settled by compromise than late 1840's the future of slavery the territory from mexico and mexican war settled by the compromise of 1850. precedent and tradition in place for another settlement the chief issue between the republicans and the south but not slavery of the 15 states. almost all americans americans, republicans included the co
grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, our dean of the school of foreign service, and doctor abraham kim, the interim president of the korea economic institute, for making this event possible. were also aren't up with is representative of the department of education, and we thank the department for its recognition of our asian studies program title vi, national resources center for east asia. it's fitting we gather today for this conversation just days before the presidential election. the topic of our discussion will take on increasing importance for our president in the next four years. secretary of state hillary clinton who offered a foreign policy address on this very stage just two weeks ago has written in foreign policy about the growing significance of the u.s. asian relationship. she wrote, one of the most important tasks of american statecraft over the next decade will be to lock in a substantially increased investment, diplomatic, economic, strategic and otherwise in the asia-
's never been a tax cut in the history of the new york city government. this is the first time it happened. [laughter] every single mayor in the past, including republicans, raised taxes. well, i did it then for eight years. ultimately, we got some really big tax cuts, and ended up being $3 billion to $4 billion in tax cuts, and we collected more revenues from the lower taxes than the higher taxes because that energized the economy. it took money out of the wasted pocket of the city and put it in the hands of people who actually spend money in a productive and sensible way that produces jobs. it was not the only thing that turned around the economy of new york city, but here's the difference. started with 10.5%. i left with 5.5% unemployment. i started with 5.1 million on welfare and left with 500,000 left on welfare. the population was 7 million when i started, and i left with 8.1 million people. a lot of that had to do with the fact we energized a private sector. that's the difference of what's going to happen with taxes, depending on the choice the american people make on november 6th.
two in state to rumor that i was going to be fired. that's the way when you're in government. i'm happy to say to cut it short for the series of crisis early in the administration with the chinese, not only this one, but the visit to the taiwan president and the way taiwan missile crisis we ended up in the following year successfully got the relationship back on track, set up a series of summits between our presidents. so it all ended well. it does underline the pendulum swing you feel in policy terms and in personal career terms. >> thank you. ambassador hill, also, thank you for joining us. coming from denver despite the logistic difficult created by hurricane sandy. the biggest challenge. >> there was no challenge coming in from denver 68 and sunny. [laughter] it's been like that for the last couple of weeks. i don't know what the fuss is. [laughter] no, let me say what a pleasure it is to back hire and thank you so much for putting this together. as i'm looking out in the audience here, i see a lot of people i worked with during the days, and, you know, as we talk about the
state officials. this would be public sector managers, government employees at high levels, ministers, the prime minister usually was basically the left, if you will, of a lot of the networks, and, of course, folks high up in the regime like the royal family. the point is that these networks or the point of the book is that these state business networks exist in every society, even in the united states, and they are usually, usually, not always, but usually corrupt and problematic, and they siphon off a lot of money, however, in some countries, there's checks and balances placed on the networks, much more so than others. in a place like syria, these checks and balances were not sufficient to check the networks anywhere in the world to prevent them from running into the ground. >> host: can you give us an example, the network of the u.s., how it exists? >> guest: after the invasion of iraq, one of the major construction or reconstruction quote-on-quote ventures was, you know, commissioned somehow or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part o
's european council, i made a strong appeal to all heads of state of government identified and oppose female candidates at european level. the economic and financial sectors, with the other representation of women is placed. i underlined that we need to be active in encouraging this process. i hope that this such renewed commitment to gender balance, parliament would base its position on the current candidate on the sole criteria of professional qualification and experience. it is urgent to fill the figure. dear colleagues, now let me move to the economic questions, which were at the core of our discussions. first, growth in jobs. we are still suffering from a lack of growth. 25 million people around employed in the union, especially among young people. the overall growth projections for next year our best models. i am aware of the told this is ticking on our societies. in several countries, the adjustment is more severe than lengthy that many had object to. and budgetary deficits and competitiveness would have been necessary but even without the crisis in the euro zone. it is therefore all
importantly in 1862, frederick holbrook went to the federal government and said that we think we can cure our wounded soldiers better if you send us to loved ones. after a long bureaucratic fight, he had permission to open three hospitals in vermont. one of them stood right here. these long wings extended. they could treat about 600 soldiers here at once. he had run the hospital with a man named henry james from waterbury, who had been the town doctor and waterbury and enlisted in the civil war with the great physician to the blink of major. he did a magnificent job. when i was finished, he came here to bonus hospital. before he left gettysburg, he was afforded a great honor for his performance. he was allowed to sit on the speaker's platform the day that lincoln gave the gettysburg address. here in this hospital, the overland campaign of 1864, it it was filled with sick and wounded soldiers. it was running at full capacity. but the cure rates were astonishingly good. the home cooking and treatments work. many vermonters lived on. the long wings were chopped up into short sections. all around
government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and his half-brother and almost looked like the same person, you took the same person and bit him in caramel. that was astounding to me. i don't know if the similarities were that profound throughout but that seemed to me -- anyone who saw the picture and that is why you selected those photographs, i would like to hear about that in terms of the true similarities and i would love to hear any comments you would care to share when families got together for the unveiling and two sides of the family together to describe in appropriate ways the interaction between them. >> the families do fin
agricultural problem demonstrates getting to humans and kills 109 people. causes the government of malaysia to call preventively 1.1 million pigs. they require the killing of pics from about that farms. some people were so scared by this disease they were at the they were abandoning the wrong farms, running away from them at farms. at one point, pigs are running this to the villages, in some cases abandoned villages of peninsular malaysia. it's a nightmare scenario, but it really happened. it's like something out of early cormac mccarthy or the book of exodus. infectious pigs running wild through the countryside, coffee and a virus. one fellow called it the one-mile barking cough because he could hear the sick pigs coming and you knew your farm would be next. real story. the buttons of the latest as the disease in humans. so this is what the scientists do. they try and solve ecology and evolutionary biology of new diseases. what is the virus live? with the reservoir host? how did humans come in contact with the virus? were they doing in many cases with the ecological disruption that causes
with in a different kind of place. or they tell me that at least. starting with government as one. you started in government. you were an inspector general with health and human services. legislative leadership out of the press corps put them in office and occasionally put out stories that have not put a lot of attention, reporters working in l.a. county where i live for the board of supervisors, they do journalistic logs or critical internally. does that have value? can't the government doing this? can you be doing journalism from within government? >> no. i don't think you can be doing journalism from within government. the office of inspector general is supposed to be -- this is that the federal level -- is supposed to be thepolitical. that is not the case. has been a long time since i worked there, when i was there during the clinton administration was absolutely not a political. people make decisions about what course you're going to take and what you're going to do. i was told during the bush administration, they would write reports that would be completely red lined and turn into a 1-pa
. government is one -- you started in government. you were the inspector general of health and human services. the legislative leadership in california hired a bunch of journalists out of the press corps to put them in office -- they figure out stories that have not gotten a lot of attention. there are reporters working in l.a. county for the board of supervisors -- they have journalistic blogs or even internally. does that have value? can the government be doing this? can you be doing journalism from government? >> no. i do not think you can be doing government from in -- journalism from in government. the inspector general is supposed to be a -- apolitical, and that was not totally the case, to be totally frank. i do not know what it is like now, but when i worked there during the clinton administration it was absolutely not apolitical. people make decisions about what it will find, what you will do. i was told that during the bush administration the oig would write reports. that are be completely redlined and turned into a one page memo if it did not fall on certain lines. so i do not thi
the executive branch of the national government. but there was more. the republican party, as i said, was proudly a northern party, turning its brief existence found in the mid-1850s, its rhetoric had a song of the south, and the south a social institution racial slavery. their determination, that is the republicans determination, that too well the north into unity that can win a national election without any southern support, republicans repeatedly condemned the south is unprogressive, undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sexual radicals known as my readers, those people who preached the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform and to the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the southsouth was and that the south had to act to protect itself from hatred of evil republicans, cries, filled with the southern air. this was not the first time sexual crisis that gripped the country, however. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these come each of the major ones have been set
on the cover. he's a leader at the harvard kennedy school of government and we we are pleased as a former naval officer that he would support our book. this one doesn't work forward with knock your socks off. we had general allen, the senior leader of our joint mission in afghanistan, admiral locklear, the senior naval officer for other regions in asia. we also had admiral malik, former chairman of the joint chiefs who sent it to classmate, john, and his other son graduated in 03 misleading sailors today. he wrote his connection to the cause. this nonprofit book, this humble book that is good for the country. and then mr. brokaw. for nine at the e-mailed his assistant. i tried really hard and i pushed and pushed, but i don't quite. and the final weeks, he submitted his blurb that has changed this book. i have some bad news. there is more security around tom brokaw and admiral mullen. [laughter] sewer with the next greatest generation? as the lead author of this project, i would say we are prepared for greatness. we served in unique ways. with blood and lost classmates and ship me and subordinat
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